Subconjunctival haemorrhage

A subconjunctival haemorrhage (hyposphagma, i.e. bleeding in the eye) often occurs spontaneously, but can also be caused by high blood pressure, for example.

Overview

A subconjunctival haemorrhage (hyposphagma, i.e. bleeding in the eye) often occurs spontaneously, but can also be caused by high blood pressure, for example. Although the eye turns red, vision is not impaired and there is no pain. It usually disappears by itself and no further treatment is required.

Symptoms

Main symptoms

  • Sudden bleeding underneath the conjunctiva

Typically, there are no further symptoms:

  • No impairment of vision
  • No pain, at most slight itching
  • No smeared eyelids, no sticky secretion

Causes and treatment

Causes

The bleeding usually occurs spontaneously, for no apparent reason. Possible causes include:

Further treatment by your doctor / in hospital

Possible tests
Possible therapies
  • Treatment of an underlying cause
  • Usually no treatment is necessary
  • The bleeding disappears on its own after two to four weeks

What can I do myself?

A subconjunctival haemorrhage looks worse than it is and usually heals on its own. If such haemorrhages occur regularly, you should go to the doctor.

When to see a doctor?

  • Painful or burning eyes
  • Impairment of vision
  • Eye doesn't “clear up” after a week
  • Frequent conjunctival haemorrhages

Synonyms

Subconjunctival haemorrhage

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CSS offers no guarantee for the accuracy and completeness of the information. The information published is no substitute for professional advice from a doctor or pharmacist.

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