Strengthen your con­nective tissue: why it's worth it & how it works

Bindegewebe stärken: Warum es sich lohnt und wie es geht Bindegewebe stärken: Warum es sich lohnt und wie es geht

Strong, trained connective tissue glides easily and is elastic. It protects the body and enables peak performance.

What is connective tissue?

Our connective tissue, also called fascia tissue, consists of an elastic material that runs through the entire body and encases organs, tendons, ligaments and muscles. When in good condition, the fascia tissue around the muscles has a slightly undulating form. It is precisely this undulating form that ensures that the fascia can move and, at the same time, hold all the organs and muscles together.

Reasons for connective tissue weakness

The older we get, and the less physical activity we engage in, the more the fascia loses its undulations. It gets sticky, making it less elastic and less able to glide. When the fascia tissue can no longer fulfil its purpose, we speak of a weakness of the connective tissue.

Fascia training

With the right training, the undulation of the fascia can be restored. The best-known exercise is probably a self-massage with a fascia ball or fascia roller. Yet fascia training consists of much more: holistic stretching and mobilisation exercises are an important part of keeping the fascia tissue pliable. Examples include yoga and Pilates exercises. It’s not for nothing that yoga is known as the oldest form of fascia training in the world.

What does strong connective tissue achieve?

Strong, trained connective tissue glides easily and is elastic. It protects the body and enables athletes to perform to their peak.

Less pain

Bouncing or stretching exercises performed on the whole body can heal the one-sided, cramped and rigid postures that often develop in everyday life. Improved posture reduces pain because one-sided straining creates small tears in the fascia which can lead to back pain.

Reduce the risk of injury

Stronger connective tissue improves a person’s mobility. When the body is subject to unaccustomed strains – as in a fall, for example – elastic, stable tissue will help prevent injury. In addition, strong connective tissue means better coordinated muscles, which improves movement sequences and also reduces the risk of injury.

Shorter regeneration time

More and more athletes swear by starting or finishing their training with a fascia roll. Fascia rolling after sport shortens recovery time. This self-massage with either a fascia ball or roller has a similar effect to lymphatic drainage: it squeezes fluid out of the tissue. Like a sponge, the tissue then fills up with fluid again – and is supplied with nutrients. This makes the muscles more readily prepared for the next training session or competition.

Toned body shape

Fascia training is also popular among fitness athletes. Even if not proven, many swear by the cellulite-reducing effect of fascia training.

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